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Apr 17

Written by: Diana West
Thursday, April 17, 2008 4:33 PM 

Yale: Student's Art Project Only 'Creative Fiction'

By JOSH GERSTEIN, Staff Reporter of the New York Sun | April 17, 2008

A Yale student’s bizarre art project in which she claimed to have repeatedly impregnated and induced abortions in herself is a work of "creative fiction," the university said in a statement this afternoon.
                                                     
The Yale Daily News reported this morning that Aliza Shvarts’s senior project, set to go on display next week, included video of her bleeding in her bathtub, as well as plastic sheeting layered with a mixture of Vaseline and the post-abortion blood.

"Ms. Shvarts is engaged in performance art," a Yale spokeswoman, Helaine Klasky, said. "She stated to three senior Yale University officials today, including two deans, that she did not impregnate herself and that she did not induce any miscarriages. The entire project is an art piece, a creative fiction designed to draw attention to the ambiguity surrounding form and function of a woman’s body."

Ms. Klasky went on to suggest that Yale would not have permitted a project of the sort described in the student newspaper. "Had these acts been real, they would have violated basic ethical standards and raised serious mental and physical health concerns."

Now I get it. The whole project is a hoax--or, rather, the hoax is the whole project. Yale would not have permitted the original project (medium: blood of miscarriages) to go on. But pretending that the original project (medium: blood of miscarriages) was for real--that's OK.

Yale's statement:

Ms. Shvarts is engaged in performance art.  Her art project includes visual representations, a press release and other narrative materials.  She stated to three senior Yale University officials today, including two deans, that she did not impregnate herself and that she did not induce any miscarriages.  The entire project is an art piece, a creative fiction designed to draw attention to the ambiguity surrounding form and function of a woman’s body.
She is an artist and has the right to express herself through performance art.
Had these acts been real, they would have violated basic ethical standards and raised serious mental and physical health concerns.

I.e., the fact that she dreamed them up and perpetrated the (performance) hoax  means she's the very picture of health and sanity?  I still say, Get the girl to a psychiatric ward--and take Yale with her.

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