Wednesday, July 23, 2014

American Betrayal

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"This explosive book is a long-needed answer to court histories that continue to obscure key facts about our backstage war with Moscow. Must-reading for serious students of security issues and Cold War deceptions, both foreign and domestic."

-- M. Stanton Evans, author of Stalin's Secret Agents and Blacklisted by History: The Untold Story of Senator Joe McCarthy and His Fight Against America's Enemies

"[West] only claims `to connect the dots,' which is a very modest description of the huge and brilliant work she has obviously done. ... It is not simply a good book about history. It is one of those books which makes history."

-- Vladimir Bukovsky, author of To Build a Castle and co-founder of the Soviet dissident movement, and Pavel Stroilov, author of Behind the Desert Storm.

"Every once in a while, something happens that turns a whole structure of preconceived ideas upside down, shattering tales and narratives long taken for granted, destroying prejudice, clearing space for new understanding to grow. Diana West's latest book, American Betrayal, is such an event."
 
-- Henrik Raeder Clausen, Europe News

"No book has ever frightened me as much as American Betrayal. ... It all adds up to a story so disturbing that it has changed my attitude to almost everything I think about how the world actually is."

-- Steven Kates, Quadrant

Her task is ambitious; her sweep of crucial but too-little-known facts of history is impressive; and her arguments are eloquent and witty. ... American Betrayal is one of those books that will change the way many of us see the world.

-- Susan Freis Falknor, Blue Ridge Forum

“What Diana West has done is to dynamite her way through several miles of bedrock. On the other side of the tunnel there is a vista of a new past. Of course folks are baffled. Few people have the capacity to take this in. Her book is among the most well documented I have ever read. It is written in an unusual style viewed from the perspective of the historian—but it probably couldn’t have been done any other way.”

-- Lars Hedegaard, historian, editor, Dispatch International

"Diana West's new book rewrites WWII and Cold War history not by disclosing secrets, but by illuminating facts that have been hidden in plain sight for decades. Furthermore, she integrates intelligence and political history in ways never done before."

-- Jeffrey Norwitz, former professor of counterterrorism, Naval War College

Diana West’s American Betrayal — a remarkable, novel-like work of sorely needed historical re-analysis — is punctuated by the Cassandra-like quality of “multi-temporal” awareness. ... But West, although passionate and direct, is able to convey her profoundly disturbing, multi-temporal narrative with cool brilliance, conjoining meticulous research, innovative assessment, evocative prose, and wit.

-- Andrew G. Bostom, PJ Media

Do not be dissuaded by the controversy that has erupted around this book which, if you insist on complete accuracy, would be characterized as a disinformation campaign.

-- Jed Babbin, The American Spectator

The most important anti-Communist book of our time.

-- J.R. Nyquist, contributor, And Reality Be Damned ... What Media Didn't Tell You about the End of the Cold War and the Fall of Communism in Europe

The polemics against your Betrayal have a familiar smell: The masters of the guild get angry when someone less worthy than they are ventures into the orchard in which only they are privileged to harvest. The harvest the outsider brought in, they ritually burn.

-- Hans Jansen, former professor of Islamic Thought, University of Utrecht 

West's lesson to Americans: Reality can't be redacted, buried, fabrictaed, falsified, or omitted. Her book is eloquent proof of it.

-- Edward Cline, Family Security Matters

In American Betrayal, Ms. West's well-established reputation for lacking "sacred cows" remains intact. The resulting beneficiaries are the readers, especially those who can deal with the truth.

-- Wes Vernon, Renew America

After reading American Betrayal and much of the vituperation generated by neconservative "consensus" historians, I conclude that we cannot ignore what West has demonstrated through evidence and cogent argument.

-- John Dale Dunn, M.D., J.D., Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons

Enlightening. I give American Betrayal five stars only because it is not possible to give it six.

-- John Dietrich, formerly of the Defense Intelligence Agency and author of The Morgenthau Plan: Soviet Influence on American Postwar Policy.

If you're looking for something to read, this is the most dazzling, mind-warping book I have read in a long time. It has been criticized by the folks at Front Page, but they don't quite get what Ms. West has set out to do and accomplished. I have a whole library of books on communism, but -- "Witness" excepted -- this may be the best.

-- Jack Cashill, author of Deconstructing Obama: The Lives, Loves and Letters of America's First Postmodern President and First Strike: TWA Flight 800 and the Attack on America

Diana West masterfully reminds us of what history is for: to suggest action for the present. She paints for us the broad picture of our own long record of failing to recognize bullies and villains. She shows how American denial today reflects a pattern that held strongly in the period of the Soviet Union. She is the Michelangelo of Denial.

-- Amity Shlaes, author of Coolidge and The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression

American Betrayal is a monumental achievement. Brilliant and important.

-- Monica Crowley, Fox News analyst, radio host and author of What the Bleep Just Happened: The Happy Warriors Guide to the Great American Comeback

"If you haven't read Diana West's "American Betrayal" yet, you're missing out on a terrific, real-life thriller."

-- Brad Thor, author of the New York Times bestsellers Hidden Order, Black List and The Last Patriot.


If the Soviet penetration of Washington, D.C., was so wide and so deep that it functioned like an occupation …
 
If, as a result of that occupation, American statecraft became an extension of Soviet strategy …
 
If the people who caught on – investigators, politicians, defectors – and tried to warn the American public were demonized, ridiculed and destroyed for the good of that occupation and to further that strategy …
 
And if the truth was suppressed by an increasingly complicit Uncle Sam …

Would you feel betrayed?

Now available from St. Martin's Press, American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation’s Character

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Mar 13

Written by: Diana West
Friday, March 13, 2009 7:27 AM 

This week's column is an elaboration on the post below. Given a few editing glitches in the final product, I include here the true version straight from typewriter.


    Forced to the ramparts to defend Rush Limbaugh against spurious, low-down attacks from the Obama White House and assorted Obamedia, conservatives, in their understandable zeal to defend a salient voice of conservatism, are letting the real enemy slip away unnamed, undetected. Who would that be? The answer is George W. Bush, whose stealth political legacy is a tectonic lurch Left for what is popularly known as "conservatism."
    A shocking statement, maybe. But one thing I came to believe long ago—at some point after the insipidness of President Bush’s Second Inaugural address about democratizing the world had sunk in—was that it very likely would have been better both for conservatism and, therefore, the country had John Kerry won in 2004.
    To be sure, it would have been a long, possibly dire four years. But four Kerry years of rampant liberalism would have likely invigorated conservatism. Eight Bush years of rampant compassionate conservatism have left it confused and feckless. Post-Bush, conservatism--small government, low tax, strong defense, and patriotic conservatism--isn’t resonating as a concept partly because it is championed by conservatives who simultaneously claim George W. Bush as their own.
    I started picking up on this conservative confusion once the Obama cabinet was taking shape and a number of conservative commentators responded by praising the Clintonian retreads (Hillary Clinton, Rahm Emanuel) and Scowcroftian non-cons (Robert Gates, James Jones) joining the new administration. Indeed, there was a strange rapture on the Right over what many touted as the “centrist” Obama cabinet—evidence, I maintain, of conservative disorientation over the shape and span of the political spectrum itself. Only if the Right has shifted Left might the Obama cabinet be labeled “centrist.” Such ideological dislocation is the result of two Bush terms of ever-expanding government, still-open borders, nation-building galore, politically correct policies toward “extremism,” and, of course, the Bush rush to socialize the US economy—all of tagged with the “conservative” brand.
    The resulting chaos--crisis, in fact--is exactly what President Obama, our new collectivist-in-chief, has seized on, not to change America's direction, but to accelerate its Leftward motion. It is the degree of continuity with Bushism that most conservatives completely miss.
    I tried to explore this continuity between 43 and 44 last week in writing on the Churchill bust that Barack Obama recently returned to the British, an act that symbolically disavows a lion of the West. Understanding the symbolism is somewhat complicated, I wrote, because of the fact that even as George W. Bush may have retained the Churchill bust and other knickknacks of Western civilization, the 43rd president did more to break with it maybe than any previous president, certainly more than any previous Republican president.
    Yes, upon attack by Islamic terrorists on Sept. 11, 2001, he ordered our armed forces to fight the undefined “war on terror” and "extremism." But Bush was first and always an internationalist, a globalist, with no patriotic calling, for example, to stem the massive illegal Hispanic influx that has transformed large swaths of the United States by replacing their Western, English-speaking heritage with a Third World, Spanish-speaking culture.
In countless ways, President Obama is merely extending and expanding policies initiated by his predecessor. From securing the border, which neither man has considered a priority, to securing a Palestinian state, which both men have considered a priority, to a shared belief in bailout packages that are nationalizing the economy, a neutered lexicon with which to address Islam, and legalizing millions of illegal aliens, there is in both leaders a transformational impulse, intensified and recognized as radicalism only in Obama's case.
    President Obama, meanwhile, is trying to camouflage himself in the confusion. Last week, following an interview with the New York Times aboard Air Force One, President Obama telephoned the reporter at his office to elaborate on the president’s answer to what was apparently a shocking question: Was he, Obama, a "socialist"?
    “It was hard for me to believe that you were entirely serious about that socialist question,” Mr. Obama told the reporter, who wrote: “He then dismissed the criticism, saying the large-scale government intervention in the markets and the expansion of social welfare programs had begun under his Republican predecessor, George W. Bush.
`It wasn’t under me that we started buying a bunch of shares of banks,’ Mr. Obama said. `And it wasn’t on my watch that we passed a massive new entitlement, the prescription drug plan, without a source of funding.’ “
    So true. But drawing on the mantle of George W. Bush should be no shield against charges of socialism. Having massively expanded the government and massively intervened in the economy, Bush checked his capitalist credentials long ago. For Obama, this really is smoke and mirrors time. Going for the grandest illusion of all, he then told the New York Times: “We’ve actually been operating in a way that has been entirely consistent with free-market principles.”
    Excuse me while I pick my jaw off the ground. Everyone knows—or should know—that putting more and more of the government in charge of more and more of the economy is entirey inconsistent with free-market principles. This means that the president’s statement to the contrary is what is known as a Big Lie. Repeat it enough, and people believe it. President Obama, of course, only has to say it once: George W. Bush, the Republicans, they started this whole thing; since they represent “conservatism,” that must make him Mr. Free Market.
    Confusing? Only so long as George W. Bush retains conservatism’s stamp of approval, thus stun-gunning conservatism. The resulting paralysis is what keeps a lot of the Obama hocus pocus going--even when the ruse is so obvious. Not to mainstream media reporters, of course; they’re hopeless. But conservatives, I’m afraid, are in denial.

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