Wednesday, April 23, 2014

American Betrayal

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"This explosive book is a long-needed answer to court histories that continue to obscure key facts about our backstage war with Moscow. Must-reading for serious students of security issues and Cold War deceptions, both foreign and domestic."

-- M. Stanton Evans, author of Stalin's Secret Agents and Blacklisted by History: The Untold Story of Senator Joe McCarthy and His Fight Against America's Enemies

"[West] only claims `to connect the dots,' which is a very modest description of the huge and brilliant work she has obviously done. ... It is not simply a good book about history. It is one of those books which makes history."

-- Vladimir Bukovsky, author of To Build a Castle and co-founder of the Soviet dissident movement, and Pavel Stroilov, author of Behind the Desert Storm.

"Every once in a while, something happens that turns a whole structure of preconceived ideas upside down, shattering tales and narratives long taken for granted, destroying prejudice, clearing space for new understanding to grow. Diana West's latest book, American Betrayal, is such an event."
 
-- Henrik Raeder Clausen, Europe News

"No book has ever frightened me as much as American Betrayal. ... It all adds up to a story so disturbing that it has changed my attitude to almost everything I think about how the world actually is."

-- Steven Kates, Quadrant

“What Diana West has done is to dynamite her way through several miles of bedrock. On the other side of the tunnel there is a vista of a new past. Of course folks are baffled. Few people have the capacity to take this in. Her book is among the most well documented I have ever read. It is written in an unusual style viewed from the perspective of the historian—but it probably couldn’t have been done any other way.”

-- Lars Hedegaard, historian, editor, Dispatch International

"Diana West's new book rewrites WWII and Cold War history not by disclosing secrets, but by illuminating facts that have been hidden in plain sight for decades. Furthermore, she integrates intelligence and political history in ways never done before."

-- Jeffrey Norwitz, former professor of counterterrorism, Naval War College

Do not be dissuaded by the controversy that has erupted around this book which, if you insist on complete accuracy, would be characterized as a disinformation campaign.

-- Jed Babbin, The American Spectator

Enlightening. I give American Betrayal five stars only because it is not possible to give it six."

-- John Dietrich, formerly of the Defense Intelligence Agency and author of The Morgenthau Plan: Soviet Influence on American Postwar Policy.

"Diana West masterfully reminds us of what history is for: to suggest action for the present. She paints for us the broad picture of our own long record of failing to recognize bullies and villains. She shows how American denial today reflects a pattern that held strongly in the period of the Soviet Union. She is the Michelangelo of Denial.”

-- Amity Shlaes, author of Coolidge and The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression

If you're looking for something to read, this is the most dazzling, mind-warping book I have read in a long time. It has been criticized by the folks at Front Page, but they don't quite get what Ms. West has set out to do and accomplished. I have a whole library of books on communism, but -- "Witness" excepted -- this may be the best.

-- Jack Cashill, author of Deconstructing Obama: The Lives, Loves and Letters of America's First Postmodern President and First Strike: TWA Flight 800 and the Attack on America

American Betrayal is a monumental achievement. Brilliant and important.

-- Monica Crowley, Fox News analyst, radio host and author of What the Bleep Just Happened: The Happy Warriors Guide to the Great American Comeback

"If you haven't read Diana West's "American Betrayal" yet, you're missing out on a terrific, real-life thriller."

-- Brad Thor, author of the New York Times bestsellers Hidden Order, Black List and The Last Patriot.


If the Soviet penetration of Washington, D.C., was so wide and so deep that it functioned like an occupation …
 
If, as a result of that occupation, American statecraft became an extension of Soviet strategy …
 
If the people who caught on – investigators, politicians, defectors – and tried to warn the American public were demonized, ridiculed and destroyed for the good of that occupation and to further that strategy …
 
And if the truth was suppressed by an increasingly complicit Uncle Sam …

Would you feel betrayed?

Now available from St. Martin's Press, American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation’s Character

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May 20

Written by: Diana West
Wednesday, May 20, 2009 6:46 AM 

AP Photo: Some of the thousands of Afghans who protested an American strike on the Taliban/"civilian casulaties," East of Kabul, in January 2009. Admiral Mullen has ordered US forces to win their "trust." Idea: How's about if he goes first?

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Afghanistan is already dubbed "Obama's War," but there's another possible father to this misbegotten conflict: David Kilcullen, the Australian former aide to Gen. Petraeus in Iraq.

(Kilcullen, of course, is infamous for the following, utterly mindless, equal parts stupid and putrid comment: "If I were a Muslim, I'd probably be a jihadist. The thing that drives these guys -- a sense of adventure, wanting to be part of the moment, wanting to be in the big movement of history that's happening now -- that's the same thing that drives me, you know?")

Kilcullen popped up in today's NYT, toward the end of yet another appalling story about US officials, including the new US ambassador to Afghanistan LTG Eikenberry (ret.), who have been snookered into going to war in Afghanistan ... in order to avoid "civilian casualties." You thought it was to "defeat" the Taliban and win one for our great ally in counter-jihad, the Afghan people (harhar)? Even that idiotic idea is now beside the point.

Avoiding civilian casualties is a curious war aim -- Kafka-esque, really.  Indeed, surrealistically speaking, fighting a war to avoid civilian casualties is fighting forever because "victory" is always out of reach -- at least so long you use live ammo. (Now there's an idea for the Joint Cheifs to mull....)

Any way you cut it, it's a great way to keep the US military over-burdened, over-stressed and over-used -- and out of the country (which could be a boon to power-grabbing presidents). But such is the "strategy" designed to win Afghan hearts and minds. Oh, and sending along more stuff: As the NYT story also reports, that Afghan prez Karzai, in one area where an American aerial bombardment led to some unagreed upon # of civilian deaths, "also promised to rebuild the villagers' houses, to arrange for some of the survivors to go on the hajj to Mecca, and to build schools, clinics, and roads in the province."

Your tax dollars at work.

But back to Kilcullen. Quote:

General Eikenberry has returned to Afghanistan after serving two years in Brussels at the headquarters of NATO. “It is clear to me that if we don’t get this right, we do run the risk of alienating the Afghan people and creating what David Kilcullen has called the accidental guerrilla,” he said, referring to a counterinsurgency expert who has advised Gen. David H. Petraeus. “Unwittingly and unintentionally we are driving away the Afghan on the ground, we are driving them away and consequently weakening the Afghan government.”

OK. Let's review: According to the US braintrust, the fact that the US has  poured men and materiel into Afghanistan for the past seven years to fight off the Taliban and still hasn't seen "the Afghan people" turn into life-long, loyal allies is no problem at all for the US at all. It simply means we need to do more to win their trust, as Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm Mike Mullen has psycho-babbled.

This, of course, is a total joke, a con job, and our leaders have fallen for it. In other words, if the Afghans were on our side, they would be, well, on our side. They would not be drive-away-able in the first place. In an Islamic country, in an Islamic milieu,  however, it is no "accident," as Kilcullen will argue, that such Muslims become "guerillas" -- just as it is no "accident" that when they go on their US-taxpayer-funded hajj excursions, they just might run into some of their Taliban brethren.

But Kilcullen and his ilk like to stay away from all context. The Washington Post recently asked him:

What are the lessons of Iraq that most apply to Afghanistan?

He replied:

I would say there are three. The first one is you've got to protect the population. Unless you make people feel safe, they won't be willing to engage in unarmed politics. The second lesson is, once you've made people safe, you've got to focus on getting the population on your side and making them self-defending.

When pigs will fly ....

And then a third lesson is, you've got to make a long-term commitment.

Lessons on how to achieve a Big, Fat Nothing for our deep and sorrowful trouble.

 

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