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American Betrayal

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"It is not simply a good book about history. It is one of those books which makes history. ... "

-- Vladimir Bukovsky, co-founder of the Soviet dissident movement and author of Judgment in Moscow, and Pavel Stroilov, author of Behind the Desert Storm.

"Diana West is distinguished from almost all political commentators because she seeks less to defend ideas and proposals than to investigate and understand what happens and what has happened. This gives her modest and unpretentious books and articles the status of true scientific inquiry, shifting the debate from the field of liking and disliking to being and non-being."

-- Olavo de Carvalho

If you're looking for something to read, this is the most dazzling, mind-warping book I have read in a long time. It has been criticized by the folks at Front Page, but they don't quite get what Ms. West has set out to do and accomplished. I have a whole library of books on communism, but -- "Witness" excepted -- this may be the best.

-- Jack Cashill, author of Deconstructing Obama: The Lives, Loves and Letters of America's First Postmodern President and First Strike: TWA Flight 800 and the Attack on America

"Every once in a while, something happens that turns a whole structure of preconceived ideas upside down, shattering tales and narratives long taken for granted, destroying prejudice, clearing space for new understanding to grow. Diana West's latest book, American Betrayal, is such an event."

 -- Henrik Raeder Clausen, Europe News

West's lesson to Americans: Reality can't be redacted, buried, fabricated, falsified, or omitted. Her book is eloquent proof of it.

-- Edward Cline, Family Security Matters

"I have read it, and agree wholeheartedly."

-- Angelo Codevilla, Professor Emeritus of International Relations at Boston Unversity, and fellow of the Claremont Institute. 

Enlightening. I give American Betrayal five stars only because it is not possible to give it six.

-- John Dietrich, formerly of the Defense Intelligence Agency and author of The Morgenthau Plan: Soviet Influence on American Postwar Policy.

After reading American Betrayal and much of the vituperation generated by neoconservative "consensus" historians, I conclude that we cannot ignore what West has demonstrated through evidence and cogent argument.

-- John Dale Dunn, M.D., J.D., Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons

"A brilliantly researched and argued book."

-- Edward Jay Epstein, author of Deception: The Invisible War between the KGB and the CIA, The Annals 0f Unsolved Crime 

"This explosive book is a long-needed answer to court histories that continue to obscure key facts about our backstage war with Moscow. Must-reading for serious students of security issues and Cold War deceptions, both foreign and domestic."

-- M. Stanton Evans, author of Stalin's Secret Agents and Blacklisted by History: The Untold Story of Senator Joe McCarthy and His Fight Against America's Enemies

Her task is ambitious; her sweep of crucial but too-little-known facts of history is impressive; and her arguments are eloquent and witty. ... American Betrayal is one of those books that will change the way many of us see the world.

-- Susan Freis Falknor, Blue Ridge Forum

"American Betrayal is absolutely required reading. Essential. You're sleepwalking without it."

-- Chris Farrell, director of investigations research, Judicial Watch

"Diana West wrote a brilliant book called American Betrayal, which I recommend to everybody ... It is a seminal work that will grow in importance." 

-- Newt Gingrich, former House Speaker 

"This is a must read for any serious student of history and anyone working to understand the Marxist counter-state in America."

-- John Guandolo, president, Understanding the Threat, former FBI special agent 

“What Diana West has done is to dynamite her way through several miles of bedrock. On the other side of the tunnel there is a vista of a new past. Of course folks are baffled. Few people have the capacity to take this in. Her book is among the most well documented I have ever read. It is written in an unusual style viewed from the perspective of the historian—but it probably couldn’t have been done any other way.”

-- Lars Hedegaard, historian, journalist, founder, Danish Free Press Society

The polemics against your Betrayal have a familiar smell: The masters of the guild get angry when someone less worthy than they are ventures into the orchard in which only they are privileged to harvest. The harvest the outsider brought in, they ritually burn.

-- Hans Jansen, former professor of Islamic Thought, University of Utrecht 

No book has ever frightened me as much as American Betrayal. ... [West] patiently builds a story outlining a network of subversion so bizarrely immense that to write it down will seem too fantastic to anyone without the book’s detailed breadth and depth. It all adds up to a story so disturbing that it has changed my attitude to almost everything I think about how the world actually is. ... By the time you put the book down, you have a very different view of America’s war aims and strategies. The core question is, did the USA follow a strategy that served its own best interests, or Stalin’s? And it’s not that it was Stalin’s that is so compelling, since you knew that had to be the answer, but the evidence in detail that West provides that makes this a book you cannot ignore. 

-- Steven Kates, RMIT (Australia) Associate Professor of Economics, Quadrant

"Diana West's new book rewrites WWII and Cold War history not by disclosing secrets, but by illuminating facts that have been hidden in plain sight for decades. Furthermore, she integrates intelligence and political history in ways never done before."

-- Jeffrey Norwitz, former professor of counterterrorism, Naval War College

[American Betrayal is] the most important anti-Communist book of our time ... a book that can open people's eyes to the historical roots of our present malaise ... full of insights, factual corroboration, and psychological nuance. 

-- J.R. Nyquist, author, Origins of the Fourth World War 

Although I know [Christopher] Andrew well, and have met [Oleg] Gordievsky twice, I now doubt their characterization of Hopkins -- also embraced by Radosh and the scholarly community. I now support West's conclusions after rereading KGB: The Inside Story account 23 years later [relevant passages cited in American Betrayal]. It does not ring true that Hopkins was an innocent dupe dedicated solely to defeating the Nazis. Hopkins comes over in history as crafty, secretive and no one's fool, hardly the personality traits of a naïve fellow traveler. And his fingerprints are on the large majority of pro-Soviet policies implemented by the Roosevelt administration. West deserves respect for cutting through the dross that obscures the evidence about Hopkins, and for screaming from the rooftops that the U.S. was the victim of a successful Soviet intelligence operation.

-- Bernie Reeves, founder of The Raleigh Spy Conference, American Thinker

Diana West’s American Betrayal — a remarkable, novel-like work of sorely needed historical re-analysis — is punctuated by the Cassandra-like quality of “multi-temporal” awareness. ... But West, although passionate and direct, is able to convey her profoundly disturbing, multi-temporal narrative with cool brilliance, conjoining meticulous research, innovative assessment, evocative prose, and wit.

-- Andrew G. Bostom, PJ Media

Do not be dissuaded by the controversy that has erupted around this book which, if you insist on complete accuracy, would be characterized as a disinformation campaign.

-- Jed Babbin, The American Spectator

In American Betrayal, Ms. West's well-established reputation for attacking "sacred cows" remains intact. The resulting beneficiaries are the readers, especially those who can deal with the truth.

-- Wes Vernon, Renew America

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Blog
Jan 13

Written by: Diana West
Sunday, January 13, 2013 6:23 AM 

Pt. 2 is here.

Pt. 1 is here.

Saudi journalist Hazma Kashgari has spent almost the entire past year in a Saudi prison -- the Islamic Gulag -- for tweeting an imaginary conversation with Mohammed. King Abdullah -- the man Barack Obama bowed to, the man George W. Bush kissed and held hands with, and the man whose nephew, Prince Talal bin Alwaleed, is a major stock-holder in Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. -- put him there. Kashgari's story, and treatment of his story at Fox and elsewhere, is below.

From the vault:

1) Blog post, February 14, 2012: "(Prince Talal's) Fox News AWOL on (Prince Talal's) Twitter Story"

Have you heard about Hazma Kashgari, the Saudi blogger who tweeted an imaginary conversation with Mohammed, drew so many (tens of thousands) angry comments from his co-religionists and co-kingdomists that he deleted his tweets, fled the country and made for New Zealand to seek asylum but was arrested in Malaysia and extradited back to Saudi A where he now faces charges on the capital crime of "blasphemy"?

Not if you watch fair and balanced Fox News, you haven't. I have searched the site but cannot find any stories about Kashgari. (You try.)  

You don't suppose the fact that Saudi dictatorship-family-member Talal bin Alwaleed owns the largest non-Murdoch stake in Fox News (7 percent) and a new stake in Twitter (almost 4 percent) has anything to do with that, do you?

2) Syndicated column, February 16, 2012: "Did Saudi Prince Buy Fox's Silence?"

Have you heard about the 23-year-old Saudi journalist who tweeted an imaginary conversation with Muhammad? It went something like this: He loved Muhammad, he hated Muhammad, he couldn't understand Muhammad, he wasn't going to pray for Muhammad. If this isn't exactly a disquisition on faith and doubt a la "The Brothers Karamazov," remember, we're just talking Twitter.

If you haven't heard of this young man, whose name is Hamza Kashgari, it could be because you're watching too much Fox News. As of this writing, almost a week after the Kashgari story broke, I haven't found a single story about it at the Fox News website. (You try: www.foxnews.com.) Meanwhile, CBS, NBC, ABC, MSNBC and CNN have all reported the Kashgari story, clueing in their viewers on how far totalitarian Islam, Saudi style, will go to exert its control over the human spirit. But not Fox.

Say -- you don't suppose the fact that Prince Alwaleed bin Talal owns the second-largest block of stock (7 percent) in News Corp., Fox News' parent company, not to mention a new $300 million stake in Twitter (almost 4 percent), has anything to do with Fox's silence on this Saudi black eye of a story? After all, it was Saudi dictator King Abdullah -- Alwaleed's uncle -- whom press accounts credit with ordering the tweeting journalist's hot pursuit and imprisonment. And it is Saudi Arabia's adherence to Islamic limits on free speech that is driving Kashgari's ordeal.

Maybe it has become institutional Fox thinking to let such news slide for fear of offending the Saudi prince -- or for fear of risking the kind of exposure that might remind viewers of Fox's connections to Saudi regime interests via Alwaleed. ....

3) Blog post, February 25, 2012: "The Kashgari Story from Right and Left"

Fox News' Bret Baier reported the Hamza Kashgari story in brief on February 20, giving it little more three tweet's worth of space (the amount of Kashgari's "blasphemous" material):

Baier said:

Finally, a young Saudi blogger has been sent back to his homeland to face trial and possible execution triggered by comments he made on Twitter that were seen as blasphemous against the Prophet Mohammed.

The smooth passive voice eliminates state actors and state religion.  

Hamza Kashgari has apologized for sending three tweets of a fictional conversation with the prophet Mohammed that quickly sparked thousands of angry responses and even death threats.

No official reaction from the Saudi government.

 

Gee, did they even have anything to do with it?

U.S. human rights groups have asked the State Department to intervene.

Kind of takes it out of Fox News' hands. What a relief! That's Saudi Conservative Media for you.

Now, for a liberal take on the story, courtesy Richard Cohen: 

Keep your eye on Hamza Kashgari. He's the 23-year-old former columnist for Saudi Arabia's Al-Bilad newspaper who had the extremely bad judgment to tweet an imaginary conversation he was having with the Prophet Muhammad.

"Extremely bad judgment"? Love the casual concession to totalitarian Islam. What would Cohen say about Solzhenitsyn's  Gulag Archipelago? I guess that was super-extremely mega-colossal bad judgment.

In almost no time, he was running for his life, hopping a plane in Jeddah and hoping to reach New Zealand. In Malaysia, where he apparently had to change planes, he was held incommunicado until a private plane arrived from Saudi Arabia. He's now back home, in jail and possibly facing a death sentence.

Rather more detail that Bret Baier gave Fox viewers.

I have a certain soft spot for fellow columnists who get into trouble, especially when the issue is what we in America would call freedom of speech.

Such a ringing declaration of human rights!

But I have a certain soft spot, too, for Saudi Arabia.

When I was there, I was treated with great courtesy and hospitality,

That was easy. 

and, like any romantic schooled in multiple viewings of "Lawrence of Arabia," I am besotted by the considerable charms of the desert. ...

Cohen of Arabia  

Sooner or later, however, Saudi Arabia has to choose what century it is in. It cannot both strive for the high-tech world of tomorrow and at the same time have medievalists dictate and limit the boundaries of freedom. Kashgari may be something of a jerk for the way he taunted the religious authorities -- and picking the Muslim nation of Malaysia for a stopover wasn't too smart, either -- but nothing he did remotely resembles a capital crime. ...

Cohen couldn't be more incorrect. What Kashgari did is indeed a capital crime -- under the law of Islam, not the law of the Free World. "Besotted" by camel opera and "hospitality," however, Cohen can't see straight. Like a Western tool under a Communist spell in days of yore, Cohen has become a transmission belt of conflicted mish-mash. But mark the egregious disparagement due to dhimmitude: In Cohen's eyes, Kashgari is "something of a jerk" for crossing the law of Islam. Doesn't he know better? This is akin to the egregious way in which Pennsylvania Judge Mark Martin disparaged plaintiff Ernest Perce as a "doofus" for crossing Islamic law in the USA. 

He continues:

In his new book, "Saudi Arabia on the Edge: The Uncertain Future of an American Ally," my former Washington Post colleague Thomas W. Lippman writes that Saudi Arabia could choose to become another Norway, an oil-rich nation transforming an abundant natural resource into a knowledge-based economy. This is what Saudi Arabia says it wants to do. Its websites bristle with news about business, about investment opportunities and the great advances the kingdom has made in just about everything. In a certain sense, this is all true.

"Norway"? In one sense, this is pure agitprop. In another,  given Norway's aggressively Arabist-Leftist government, it is more apt that either Cohen or Lippmann may realize. 

But the Kashgari affair shows a Saudi underbelly that is just plain revolting.

An "underbelly" is unseen, netherworld stuff. Sharia in Saudi Arabia is front and center -- just past the camels and the hospitality. 

There is nothing romantic about beheadings, and there is nothing romantic about religious zealotry. The kingdom in fact was founded by marrying the House of Saud with the zealous and intemperate Ikhwan, a fierce Bedouin tribal army.

The "House of Saud" being a bunch of free-thinking Bohos before some unfortunate matchmaking ....

The alliance enabled Ibn Saud to conquer much of the Arabian Peninsula. It has been an absolute and extremely conservative monarchy ever since. ...

Ever since the 7th century, he means. 

Saudi Arabia's history and culture are unique -- and so, too, is the role the nation plays in Islam. It is host to Mecca and Medina, cities of immense religious significance,

"Host"?

and if the royal family comes under any pressure for religious reasons, it is not for being intolerant but for not being intolerant enough. This is a very strange land.

This is a very strange column.

I am aware of the king's role as custodian of the holy places, and I am aware of his political need to mollify the country's powerful and totally medieval religious establishment.

Clearly, we are hearing the yarn Cohen's hospitable Saudi hosts spun for him. Poor King, you see, is in between a rock and hard place -- just as Stalin, for example, used to be when he, such a  reasonable fellow, had to mollify that pesky Politburo.(Of course, just as Stalin was boss of the Politburo, the King, according to many press accounts, ordered up Kashgari's capture and return to house arrest.)

Then, Cohen seems to unravel a little: 

But Saudi Arabia cannot remain under the thumb of an extremely reactionary religious establishmentthat in some sense is as powerful as the royal family. It's hard to attract -- or keep -- first-class talent in what, after all, is a very weird place. Women are not permitted to drive, and the chance remark, if it is deemed heretical, can result in draconian punishment.

Frankly, the economic progress of Saudi Arabia does not concern me today -- and neither do the complicated role and obligations of the king

My cultural relativism takes me only so far. It stops way short of condoning the execution of anyone for an errant, if silly, tweet.

A life is on the line. I asked the Saudi Embassy in Washington the status and the whereabouts of Kashgari and was told to put my request in writing -- an e-mail. That was late last week and I have heard nothing. So keep your eye on Hamza Kashgari -- in some ways the future of Saudi Arabia, in all ways merely a terrified human being.

Poor Saudi Arabia?
----
That was then.
For an update on Kashgari's August 2012 public repentance (to no avail), see this Saudi Gazette story here. In seeking news of Kashgari's case, I came across two other cases of Saudis now facing death for apostasy. Raef Badawi of the Saudi Liberal Network was arrested in June (for, it seems, running a web page on which Islam could be debated), and was in court in December. Also in December, Turki Al Hamad, a well known Saudi novelist and intellectual, was arrested for one tweet calling for a "correction" to Islam. Al Hamad's arrest, gulfnews.com reported, "came upon direct orders of the kingdom’s interior minister," Prince Mohammad Bin Nayef.

Prince Nayef is Prince Alwaleed's first cousin. 

Murdoch should divest his media empire of its totalitarian House of Saud financial entanglements.

Meanwhile, the Qataris, the Muslim-Brotherhood-aligned powers behind and throughout Al Jazeera -- which, of course, is entering the US media via Al Gore's Current TV deal -- have imprisoned a poet for life for a poem about Arab Spring. Here is Al Jazeera's update on the story, which has received international attention.

Since 1992 -- George H. W. Bush? -- the US and Qatar have increasingly become militarily intertwined to the point that now the U.S. Central Command’s Forward Headquarters and the Combined Air Operations Center are located there.

The US should divest itself of its Muslim Brotherhood-Qatari military entanglements.

Hah.

OK. So how about pushing for major North American energy exploitation so maybe one day we begin to regain a little moral independence?       


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